Engineering and Campus Energy builds and maintains the infrastructure on, and below, the Princeton University campus. We are responsible for the operations and maintenance of the central energy plant, the design and management of building system upgrades, and energy management. Using best practices in the design and execution of engineering projects, we support Princeton University's Sustainability plan by reducing energy use and environmental impacts. Our staff includes plant operators, mechanical and electrical engineers, as well as building control system operators and designers. No matter what, we aim to keep the lights on and the steam flowing.

For more detail on our department, feel free to explore our organizational chart or find a team member in our staff directory.

Helpful links:

In The News

  • Jun. 22, 2018

    No, we're not trying to pull the wool over your eyes - say hello to the newest maintenance system at the Solar field. Ewe might think that this tight-knit crew just gets along on a few blades of grass, but we assure you they have the shear determination to get the job done.

  • Mar. 30, 2017

    Sustainable Business Magazine spoke to Ted Borer, our Energy Plant Manager, about natural disasters, economic dispatch and the community benefits of microgrids. We do like being a Good Neighbor.

  • Nov. 2, 2016

    The University’s Office of Sustainability celebrated its tenth anniversary with a party at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment on Friday, Oct. 21.

More news

  • Nov. 2, 2016

    This year marks the 10th anniversary of the founding of Princeton University's Office of Sustainability, the hub that supports, monitors and connects initiatives across campus focused on cultivating positive global and local impacts in the environment. 

  • May. 25, 2016

    A riddle: Which local entity finds 12,000 people working daily in its buildings and roaming its walks and roads? Which entity generates power from a fighter jet engine, has installed a large solar array, and calculates a self-imposed a carbon tax?

  • Sep. 11, 2015

    Princeton University is making campus lighting more sustainable and efficient one fixture at a time. Through the Lighting Efficiency Upgrade Program, the University will convert more than 100,000 fixtures to light-emitting diode (LED) technology in buildings across campus. The improvements will significantly reduce carbon emissions, promote cost savings and limit waste.

  • Jul. 27, 2015

    Large energy users such as industrial facilities, hospitals, apartment complexes and universities seeking energy resiliency, stability in energy prices and the ability to operate independent of the grid are increasingly turning toward combined heat and power, or CHP, facilities to meet at least a portion of their energy needs.

  • Jun. 9, 2015

    The most advanced microgrids use multiple fuel sources, multiple power-generating assets, energy storage, CHP production, and modern digital controls. They operate with an awareness of the real-time commodity costs of fuel and electricity.

  • Feb. 4, 2015

    Sustainable Business Magazine talks to three key representatives from Princeton University about the investment, research, and technology undertaken on its campus that has made it stand out as a leader in environmental issues. Read the full story in the Sustainable Business Magazine.

  • Jan. 5, 2015

    The Princeton Energy Plant is a district energy facility that provides electricity, steam, and chilled water to power, heat, and cool the buildings on the Princeton University campus. The creation of the plant and the continuous refinement of its operation have had a very positive impact on Princeton's carbon footprint. Princeton's carbon emissions reduction goal, as stated in the Sustainability Plan, is to reduce emissions to 1990 levels by 2020.

  • Jan. 5, 2015

    Reverse Osmosis Heat System

    The water that circulates through boilers is constantly being replenished with water from an outside source. The reverse osmosis conditioning system removes minerals and ions from the incoming water. It's one of the key systems that keeps up efficiency and keeps down maintenance costs.

  • Jan. 5, 2015

    Another key component to Princeton's energy management program are building controls, specifically, replacing older pneumatic controls with direct-digital-control (DDC) technology. The University uses full direct digital control (DDC) in 125 buildings on Campus. All of the heaviest energy-use buildings are included. There are over 80,000 control points in the system.

  • Dec. 8, 2014

    ...One shining example was Princeton University’s microgrid, which was able to ‘island’ itself from the main grid and provide much-needed power to 12,000 people.

  • Dec. 7, 2014

    Working in tandem with the Princeton Energy Plant, the implementation and continuous refinement of the energy management plan have had a very positive impact on Princeton's carbon footprint. 

Did you know?

  • Two “micro-steam” power-generating systems under Dillon Gym produce enough electricity to power several dorms. These self-contained power systems replace pressure reduction valves, capturing energy that would go unused.